Blog Archives

Spotlight On The Board Of Directors: Alice In Wonderland JR.

Welcome to Alice In Wonderland JR. at the Waukesha Civic Theatre presented by our A.C.T. program. Join Alice as she chases the White Rabbit down the rabbit hole and journeys through a topsy-turvy world that gets “curiouser and curiouser.” Meet the Mad Hatter, Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum, the Cheshire Cat, March Hare, Caterpillar, the flowers, Doorknob, Queen & King of Hearts and more unforgettable characters as they take to the stage.

This fun-filled tale is being performed by students aged 6-17 and they are having a great time. These students come to Waukesha Civic to experience participating in a Mainstage show. They get the experience of going through an audition process in a safe and encouraging environment. This program gives each student the opportunity to participate, as they are all guaranteed a role in the production. They are taught how to support their fellow actor friends and how to handle disappointment and to realize that all roles are important to make a show complete. Once casting is finished, the students go through a full rehearsal process and gain a better understanding and appreciation of everything that goes into a Mainstage production. This program wants every student to grow and gain confidence in their stage skills.

I have an older child that started in the summer A.C.T. Production shows about 5 or 6 years ago now. Her experience was amazing as she took to the stage and I watched her confidence grow. The support she received and the skills she learned are helping her in her current performances as well as helped shape her into the person she is today. So, it was no question to me when my next 2 daughters wanted to try acting as to where to send them. They are both in this Alice In Wonderland JR. production and once again the encouragement, skills training, and support from the directors and other kids is building their confidence and they LOVE coming to rehearsal 5 days a week in the middle of summer.

When I asked my 9-year-old daughter about her experience in the show, she said: “It is amazing! Just being here and being able to be a part of the show is amazing. You get to be someone else. You get to see a whole different side of yourself. And you get to try new things. Everyone in the show is so supportive which makes it fun and more comfortable.”

I realized, from observing my own children, that each of these kids may have overcome an obstacle to be on this stage today. They may have stage fright, extreme shyness, anxiety, or they might just be a natural performer who is working on enhancing their skills. This stage experience, along with the entire A.C.T. program at Waukesha Civic Theatre, is helping to shape their futures. Check out our theatre website for additional A.C.T. program opportunities.

 

Thank you for supporting the A.C.T. program. Sit back and enjoy the show!

Nancy McCaskey

Board Director

Advertisements

Before The Lights Come Up

There was a time in my life as an actor, when I would put off the hardest thing about a role.  Perhaps it would be a difficult emotional moment, or a new dialect, or any number of things that would make me uncomfortable.  I would hope that through the process of rehearsal, these moments would take care of themselves.  Of course, they seldom did, and come opening night I would dread those moments.

I got involved in a 24 hour theatre project when I was living in Los Angeles and it changed my perspective on tackling a role.  Here there was no time to prepare.  Too many lines?  Too bad, you’ve only got 12 hours.  You’ve never done a Spanish accent before?  Sorry, you go up in 6 hours.  Having a hard time crying for this scene?  Better figure it out because you are going on next.

There is a moment just before you enter the stage where you are absolutely terrified.  This could very well not work.  But you push yourself over that threshold, somehow it does work, and you leave the stage feeling like you can do anything for the next month.  From that moment forward I haven’t looked back on my old way of thinking.  I now find the most difficult part of a role and I tackle it first.

I’ve been producing Combat Theatre for almost 20 years now, Combat Boot Camp for 12, and I’ve seen so many other actors, both professional and student, face that same fear and challenge over and over again.  And I’ve seen the way they feel after they triumph, and how it changes them.  I can’t think of a better or more entertaining acting exercise.

James Fletcher