Blog Archives

Director’s Note: Candy Cane Tales And Holiday Carols

Growing up, Christmas Eve was a night I couldn’t wait for. Not only because I knew Santa would be coming, but because it was always a night I got to see all of my cousins, aunts, uncles, and grandparents. We would drive to my grandparents and the kids would march upstairs to play together with the old toys that were still there from the generation prior to us. We’d rehearse and put on a concert for our parents (complete with ripped up paper snow) and we knew if we listened closely, we would hear Santa’s sleigh. We always knew we were too loud and rowdy when one of our parents yelled up the stairs because the dining room chandelier was shaking (which happened to be right under the room we were in and right above the table where they were playing sheepshead). Opening presents was always exciting, but not nearly as exciting as the quality time spent with family. It was a night filled with love.

After my grandparents all passed, the family rotated who hosted Christmas Eve for a couple of years and some family members stopped coming. Eventually, my husband and I decided we wanted to pick up the tradition. This year will be our 6th year hosting Christmas Eve and it’s now become one of the days of the year my daughter counts down until. The night is filled with family, friends, singing, laughing and, most importantly, love.

When John Cramer approached me about co-directing and shared the concept for the show, I knew I had to hop on board. I think just about every cast member has commented at some point how much the love the holiday season. It’s been fun hearing the stories from the cast on their favorite holiday memories. Thank you to our cast, crew and production staff for making this story come to life. Every time I work on a show, I’m reminded why community theatre is so amazing.

As you sit back and enjoy the show, you might find a scene reminds you of something, a character may remind you of someone, you might hear your favorite holiday tune, but what I hope the most is that you feel is just how much dedication and love went into this production. Happy Holidays and thank you for coming to the show! Enjoy!

 

 

Kelly Goeller

Director

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Director’s Note: Billy Elliot The Musical

Bringing this story to life has been something of a challenge and at the same time, a real pleasure. Billy Elliot is a show that has a lot of dance elements in it (because Billy dreams of being a ballet dancer, that makes sense…) and I’m not used to working on a show that has so much dance involved. I have been SO lucky to be able to work with Ceci and Emily and their amazing commitment to creating the first rate dance numbers you’re about to see. It has been so cool to see the cast grow through rehearsals and watch the numbers really come together. Our collaboration has helped shape the feel of the production and helped me to be a better member of our creative team. I’m glad I had Ceci to rely on and bounce ideas off… she’s done amazing things!

I had the privilege of seeing this show in NYC in 2009 and it quickly became a favorite of mine.  I could easily relate to Billy and his dreams of being something other than what was expected.  The most moving part of this show to me, is how the community comes together in the midst of turmoil and uncertainty for them to help Billy reach for his dreams. Their support and encouragement help him find the strength to be true to himself and start down his path to the future.

I’ve always had the support of my family and close friends – they’ve been “right behind me” as I’ve been following my dream of doing theatre for nearly 40 years. This production staff has also been such a pleasure to work with – Ceci, Sharon, Yeng, Michael, Chris, Josh, Keith, Emily, Terri, Kristin and of course my Stage Manager (and right arm) – Debbie (you’re STILL not fired!!). Thank you guys SO much! My job is easy when I have the quality support and creativity that you bring to our productions! This cast has been a joy to work with as well. They truly represent the spirit of Community Theatre and have worked VERY hard to bring this story to the stage.

I hope you enjoy our show as much as we’ve enjoying bringing it to you. I have to agree with the lyrics in Expressing Yourself – “life is gray enough without making it worse – what we need is INDIVIDUALITY!” I hope you find the courage and the support to truly be who you are. Follow your dreams, you never know where they will take you.

 

 

 

Enjoy!

Mark E. Schuster

Director

Director’s Note: The Musical Comedy Murders Of 1940

If you like mysteries, you are probably fond of sifting through red herrings (“clues” that are planted just to mislead).  If so, The Musical Comedy Murders Of 1940 is the show for you. The red herrings begin even with the title.  (Did you think you were going to see a musical? Red Herring!). Although there are a few catchy numbers, this show is not a musical at all. Instead, the concept of a trying out a new musical is a red herring for the actor-characters who believe they are auditioning for the production. And that’s just the beginning!

The clues—real and not so real—in this show will keep you guessing. Are there actual police present? How many? Are they trying to catch “The Stage Door Slasher” or a Nazi saboteur—or

both? Is Eddie really a (very struggling) comedian or a fledgling detective?  Is Elsa a slightly ditzy hostess or a murderer on the loose? Is there one Helsa—or two—or three? And, in the midst of the murderous mayhem, is there romance in the air? In another two hours, you’ll know all the answers.

Thanks to the cast for hard work, good humor, and willingness to take chances. Special appreciation to the non-applauded production staff: Scott P. and Jeff for our secretive set, Sharon and Ellen for classy costumes, Scott F. and Keith for audible and electric effects, Matt for his creative compositions, Christopher for our frantic fights, Meghan for deft dialects, and Katie for her magnificent managing. A theatrical production does, indeed, take a village.

It’s a mystery. It’s a comedy (please do laugh!). And it’s just meant to be fun. So, stay awake and sift through those red herrings, but do relax and enjoy!

 

 

 

Thanks for supporting the arts!

Carol Dolphin 🐬

Director

Director’s Note: Father Knows Best

Thank you for coming to see our re-creation of one of the most beloved television shows of the 1950’s. The show ran for 6 seasons, on two different networks, and was watched by millions, maybe even you!

We are performing this as a period piece, and have kept the characters, language, and social mores of the fifties intact. If you are one of the lucky people to have seen the television show, we’re sure you’ll like our production. If you didn’t, we’re sure you’ll like our production!

 

 

 

Dave Scott

Director

Director’s Note: Wait Until Dark

Stillness. Darkness. Quiet.

Take a moment to close your eyes. Allow your other senses to take over. What do you hear? What do you smell? What are you touching? Imagine for a moment how it would feel if your sight were suddenly taken from you. How does it make you feel?

One of the things I love about directing theatre is how the process allows us as a cast/crew to step outside our lives and for a moment step into the lives of the characters in the show. This is done through sounds, lighting, set design, props, and character development. When Frederick Knott wrote Wait Until Dark, he certainly wrote it in a way that is designed to engage all of these senses.

The smell of something burning, the sounds of doors and footsteps, the warmth of the lights, the coolness of the dark. These are all things the characters experience, but they don’t all experience them the same.

Susy Hendrix is living in a world of dark. She recently lost her sight in an accident and is learning how to live without it. At first, it might seem that her blindness would be a disadvantage against Roat, Carlino, and Mike; however, as the story progresses, it turns out that might not be the case. Enjoy the characters, for each is unique and have different motivations. Each character is experiencing the days that the play takes place in different ways.

The process of bringing Wait Until Dark began with a cast sitting around a table, reading a script… but is ending with a show that engages all of the senses and will leave you wondering what happens next. Thank you to my amazing production staff and cast for bringing this show to life!

Enjoy the Show!

 

 

Kelly Goeller

Director

Director’s Note: The Complete Works Of William Shakespeare (abridged)

I usually use this space to share with you the themes of the play, what they mean to me, and how they apply to our present time and culture. And indeed, the plays of William Shakespeare have had a profound impact on my life. It was seeing The Comedy Of Errors as a sophomore in high school that first got me interested in theatre and radically changed my life. I am working my way through seeing all his plays performed on stage or screen (only six to go!).

Well, forget all of that. Sure, The Complete Works Of William Shakespeare (abridged) is an appreciation of the playwright and his immeasurable impact on the world. But, don’t worry – no knowledge or love of Shakespeare is needed. I think The Today Show put it best when, reviewing the show they stated: “If you like Shakespeare, you’ll love this show. If you hate Shakespeare, you’ll love this show!”

So, prepare yourself for a whirlwind theatrical experience that is unlike anything you’ve seen before. This is going to be a high-speed roller coaster ride so buckle in and keep your hands and feet inside the theater at all times.

Oh, and one more thing… you best be ready. You never know when we might be calling on you for help tonight!

 

Dustin J. Martin

Director

MAD Corner/Director’s Note: The House Without A Christmas Tree

As Andy Williams said, “It’s The Most Wonderful Time Of The Year.”  And in the words of Blues Traveler: “If it’s Hanukah, or Kwanzaa, Solstice Harvest, or December 25th, peace on earth to everyone, and abundance to everyone you’re with.”

I love this season, and I love WCT’s tradition of presenting an affordable family show for the community to enjoy.  This season we present a story that is near and dear to my heart.  I grew up watching after school specials (anyone else remember those?) and one of my favorites was The House Without Christmas Tree starring Jason Robards.  There wasn’t a stage adaptation of the story available to produce, so we asked our own Doug Jarecki to tackle the project.  He used the original story, the after school special screen play, and added a few things of his own to create a funny and heartwarming stage adaptation featuring seven adults and twenty children.

Not only are we presenting this beautiful adaptation as our December Mainstage show, the holiday season at WCT is full of amazing entertainment options, including Joel Kopischke’s I Got Yule, Babe, The Wisconsin Philharmonic Chamber Concert featuring The Apollo Trio, our PIX Flix feature film It’s A Wonderful Life, and The Four Guyz In Dinner Jackets: Now In Technicolor!

If you’re looking for even more holiday season entertainment, don’t miss ‘Twas The Month Before Christmas at Next Act Theatre.  This is another Doug Jarecki script, and we are both in it.

And remember, if you’re looking for a good gift to give this season, consider our Festive Flex Four For $64 ~ or a gift card ~ or one of Joel Kopischke’s CDs … wonderful gifts of theatre to share with anyone, or to treat yourself!  Happy Holidays!

 

John Cramer

Managing Artistic Director

Director: The House Without A Christmas Tree

Director’s Note: The Hunchback Of Notre Dame

Thank you for joining us.

I’ve been a lover of the theatre for more than three quarters of my almost 50 years here on Earth. At a young age, I was enthralled by the storytelling and the magic that happened on stage. I was also raised Catholic, and I think that a big part of my love for the theatre came from my time spent in church – the music, the pageantry, the storytelling, the grand design of the space and even the smells took me to another world. Theatre does the same thing. This show is an amazing combination of the two for me!

The classic story by Victor Hugo and this version made popular by the Disney animated motion picture asks us to consider the idea – What makes a monster and what makes a man? It raises many questions – is the lonely, deformed hunchback the monster or is it the pious, God-loving Archdeacon? Which one is truly ugly on the inside? Does the outside matter? Can we see beyond physical deformity to the person beneath the surface?

Ultimately, we are all human.

Frollo makes it clear early on that he despises all Gypsies. His hatred for them seems to drive his every move. Does any group of people deserve to be hated simply because of who they are or where they come from? Can a race justifiably be universally condemned? Doesn’t everyone deserve to be treated equally and fairly? Esmeralda challenges Frollo’s thoughts and awakens something in the Archdeacon that he’s never faced before. Opening ourselves up to one person could literally change our lives. This show will hopefully make us all think about “what side” we’d rather be on – the judge or the judged, the lover or the loved, the monster or the man. If theatre can entertain us AND make us think, then I think it is most effective.

I hope you enjoy the fruits of the labor of a truly incredible group of people. I am so very lucky to have the chance to work with these amazing performers, musicians and design team. They are all top notch and I thank them for sharing in this vision. I do what I do to work with folks like you!

May you be filled with more of Heaven’s Light and less Hellfire. Celebrate the good in your life. Accept and encourage. Take a chance. Stand up for what you believe. Love.

Enjoy the show!

 

Mark E. Schuster

Director

Director’s Note: Sex Please We’re Sixty

On the surface, I am an unconventional choice as a director for Sex Please We’re Sixty.  What does a man in his thirties know about the romantic lives of menopausal women and a sixty-something Casanova?  Turns out, not a whole lot. 

But as I got to know Bud, Mrs. Stancliffe, and the visitors of the Rose Cottage Bed and Breakfast, I discovered a more universal story, one that speaks to people of all ages; especially those of my generation.

In today’s world, more than ever before, we find ourselves looking for a sense of purpose. We get caught up in the business of our jobs, our kids, countless activities, the news of the world. We tell friends and family that we’ll visit, “when things settle down” or “when we have time.” We send emails or texts instead of making phone calls. Entire stories are told in 140 characters, a small series of pictures, or a six-second video. The digital age has made us more connected, but many people feel more isolated.

This show is a reminder that at all ages, we seek love, companionship, and a purpose in life. Sometimes we pretend to be something we aren’t in order to get what we think we want. Sometimes we get stuck in a routine and need an objective person to give us a push in a new direction. Sometimes the things we want require the most effort and time (even 20 years). Sometimes we need someone to see us for who we truly are, flaws and all. At the end of the day, we’re all just human beings wanting to be loved and accepted.

Thank you to the cast and crew for all their hard work on this show, to John Cramer for this opportunity to direct my first show at WCT, and to family and friends for their support.

 

 

Peter Kao
Director

 

Director’s Note: Barefoot In The Park

Barefoot In The Park is known by many for the 1967 movie adaption directed by Gene Saks and starring Robert Redford (Paul) and Jane Fonda (Corie). However, it all started four years before that on October 23rd, 1963 when it opened at the Biltmore Theatre on Broadway. It ran for a total of 1,530 performances closing on June 25th, 1967, making it Neil Simon’s longest-running hit. Robert Redford also played Paul in the Broadway performance, and Elizabeth Ashley played Corie.

This production is set in 1963. While times have changed around the woman’s role in the household since then, many of the challenges Corie and Paul are presented during their first four days living together after their blissful honeymoon, along with how they deal with them, remain timeless.

We laughed a ton during rehearsals as we each thought back to our own relationships, and how spot on Neil Simon was. The nosey mother, the crazy neighbor, and the reality that hits after the honeymoon is over. But, ultimately realizing that with your loved one at your side, you can conquer it all, even if it doesn’t feel like it at the moment. For many actors, the roles in Barefoot In The Park are bucket list roles, and I know that to be true for several of our cast members. I think you’ll understand why after seeing the show. I am truly lucky for the caliber of cast, crew, and production staff I have working with me side-by-side on this production. I don’t think I’ve ever had so much fun at rehearsals as I did working with this cast. I hope you have as much fun watching the show as the cast does performing it!

 

Kelly Goeller

Director